Critique

Founded in 1997, Word Weavers International is dedicated to providing a forum for Christian writers to critique one another's work in a face-to-face format, whether in a traditional chapter or in Word Weavers' unique online "pages," so as to improve craft. Writers of all levels are welcome.

Events

Each October, Word Weavers International holds an annual event, Florida Christian Writers Conference, for writers at every level. FCWC is held at Lake Yale Baptist Conference Center, which is nestled in the splendor and majesty of a large cluster of live oaks and a wide sparkling lake to bring not only writing instruction but spiritual refreshing. Word Weavers provides scholarships to members and nonmembers alike.

Community

By holding monthly meetings, providing constant contact through news blasts and our newsletter, and by use of social media means, Word Weavers offers its writers a sense of community. Word Weavers is highly recognized within our industry, its members respected for their professionalism and work.

The mission of Word Weavers International is to help members find their unique voice, strive for the exceptional and not settle for the mundane, and to raise the quality of our members’ writing to a publishable level. We endeavor to fulfill our mission and vision by:

 

 Actively praying for one another’s successes

 Holding regularly-scheduled critique sessions

 Offering annual conferences for in-depth learning and networking

 Providing scholarship funds to conferences to our members

 Sharing information about writing opportunities, conferences, and contests through our newsletter, The Loom

 Offering smaller, genre-specific critique groups in addition to the general critique sessions when possible

 Helping connect members with editors, agents, and other publishing professionals

 Providing guest speakers at meetings, retreats, and workshops

The Sandwich Critique Method

 

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I Love You

2/26/2021 9:00:00 AM BY Joan Borton

           

I Love You

            “I wish there were someone like Joan in Indiana.”

            Jerry prayed those words as he returned home from a disability ministry conference. I had no idea of his thought or prayer as I flew home to California. 

            For six years we attended the same gathering. After the meetings, a group of us hung out, played games, and built friendships.

            God answered Jerry’s prayer with a reminder: the phone worked between Indiana and California. Four months later, he gathered the courage to call me after hours. He didn’t declare any feelings. We simply shared updates of our lives, and ministries, and laughed together. 

            That August call morphed into phone dating. Rapidly the frequency changed from random, to weekly, to daily, to several times a day. 

            As the calendar turned to February, I wondered what to do for Valentine’s Day. We were two-thirds of a country away, and still figuring out our relationship. His secretary, thank you, Connie, prompted him to send me something.

            I made two cookie bars in the shape of hearts. From a specialty bakery, I purchased a cookie in the shape of a phone receiver. I laid those out with the phone between the two hearts connected by a string. My sappy note said something about our hearts being connected through the phone. I mailed it, praying it would arrive intact.

            When a package arrived for me, I found a card and note. I glanced first at the signature, hoping to see “Love, Jerry.” But love was not there. With the card was a large, frilly, heart-shaped box of chocolates. The unusual part was the heart was not hermetically sealed in plastic, as is typical. 

            I opened the box of chocolate and found a sticky note, “I knew you’d want to share with me!” and sure enough, one piece of chocolate was missing. 

            That alone made this a Valentine’s Day to remember, but it got better. That weekend when we talked, Jerry haltingly said, “I think … I might … be falling in love with you.” The words every girl longs to hear.

            I replied, “I love you too.” Hearing my response emboldened him to say with confidence, “I love you.”

            Phew! The love ice broke. 

            This year we celebrate our 27th Valentine’s Day together. I still share my chocolate with him, and “I love you” is one of the most frequently used phrases in our lives.  

 

 

 

Joan Borton is a long-time disability advocate. She and Jerry married in 1995. Joan is a member of Tampa WW and President of WW Page 29.

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